Muddy shoes

Allison decided it was appropriate to walk through the center of the drying wetland, rather than the edge.  Her untied shoes were consequently engulfed by the wetland soil, and, instead of assisting her, I took photographs.  Notice the change in facial expression across time; from left to right, laughing to disgust.cross-creek-county-park-11-2-2008-11-38-35-amcross-creek-county-park-11-2-2008-11-38-46-am

Friday, I mean, Monday Fungus

p2222920p2222918I’d like to challenge Dan to identify this  fungus (?…maybe it’s not a fungus at all…) that I found protruding from the bark of a tree (I think a maple of some kind).

I don’t know what it is, but it looked cool, and it had a great view of the gorge at Letchworth State Park.

Yasso Farm on Leicester Hill

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A sepia toned image of the Yasso barn on Dunkley Road in Leicester. It’s like the Old West…

This farm borders the Leicester Falls, and, as such, I occassionally crossed through the pasture to get to the falls as a teenager.  Several of these crossings led to trouble, since bulls often inhabited the pasture.  I recall running from bulls a couple of times, and, in one instance, running at full sprint through the pasture from an angry swarm of bees that ended up stinging me and a friend upwards of 10 times between the two of us.   I don’t think I have ever ran that fast since.

Northern Water Snake

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While collecting stream insects for some lab rearing I was doing, I ran into this water snake.  Of course, I immediately picked it up and, astonishingly, was not bitten.  After a futile attempt to calm the snake, I set him down and snapped a few pictures of its aggressive, flatten stance.  The scale across the snake’s eye is blueish, indicating that it will likely molt soon.  Indeed, a couple of days later, I caught the same snake (well, presumably the same one, given that it was under the same piece of bark), and it had a fresh, shinning layer of scales. Further, its aggressiveness was reduced the second time around, adding to evidence, at least in my experience, that snakes get kind of angry when they are close to molting.