Tag Archives: Valle de La Estrella

Satiny Parrot Snake

I’m a little rusty on photographing… plus, I didn’t have my flash with me at the time of encountering this parrot snake (Leptophis sp.), so the photos I got were pretty poor.  In any case, this is one of two species that occur on the caribbean slope: L. ahaetulla or L. depressirotris. 

Satiny Parrot Snake - Leptophis sp. (ahaetulla or depressirotris) - 20130617 - 5

Satiny Parrot Snake - Leptophis sp. (ahaetulla or depressirotris) - 20130617 - 3

Juvenile tropical night lizard

A few days after Boa released an adult Yellow-spotted tropical night lizard (Lepidophyma flavimaculatum), we discovered that she had reproduced.  These night lizards are viviparous, giving birth to live young, and are often parthenogenetic.

Tropical Night Lizard - Lepidophyma flavimaculatum - 20130617 - 4

Tropical Night Lizard - Lepidophyma flavimaculatum - 20130617 - 1

Red-eyed leaf frog

Outside Boa’s home, a male Agalychnis callidryas has set up territory in an ornamental plant hanging over a swimming pool. It calls each evening and is regularly successful in procuring some eggs.  Here’s a few photos of him and his fertilized eggs.  The development of the tadpoles are in various stages – once the tadpoles use up all the yolk in their eggs, they will escape the egg and fall into the pool below the leaf that they are attached to.  Unfortunately, there is no water in the pool, but Boa try to rear them in buckets around the house (inadvertently breeding mosquitoes too…).  Ants also prey on the developing eggs too.

Agalychnis callidryas

Agalychnis callidryas

Agalychnis callidryas eggs
Well developed larvae. Most of these had dropped two days after this photo was taken.
Two separately laid batches of eggs sit side by side.  There are ants preying on the more developed eggs.
Two separately laid batches of eggs sit side by side. There are ants preying on the more developed eggs.

Raising scorpions

 

One of Boa’s many projects is to raise field-collected Centruroides sp. and create a large terrarium at this house, where he can shine a black light on them (chemicals in scorpion exoskeletons fluoresce under UV light) and wow some tourists.  He’s had two successfully reproducing females.  Here’s the latest batch; all of the babies are still attached to the mother.  The juveniles of the other (not pictured) have begun to explore on their own. Scorpion - Centruroides sp. - 20130619 - 4

Scorpion - Centruroides sp. - 20130619 - 7